If another European country is responsible for your asylum procedure, Germany must ask the authorities of that country, within three months of your asylum application, whether you can return to that country. (The exact date on which you submitted your asylum application to the German authorities must be provided by the proof of arrival) The other country must respond to this request within two months. No response is considered an agreement. [48] The website is available in German at www.asyl.net/recht/dublin-entscheidungen/. Search with the keyword „recognized“. The agreement was supposed to allow for a voluntary distribution of migrants arriving in Italy and Malta, but it has so far worked on a case-by-case basis and with a standstill, leading to more deadlock situations, especially in recent months, when Italy and Malta again declared their ports closed due to the coronavirus. Since there is a lag between the acceptance of an application and the transferred person, both parts of the rate – applications accepted in a calendar year and a calendar year – may not relate to the same class of persons. This allows, in exceptional cases, to have rates higher than 100%. Some of the persons whose applications are processed under the Dublin procedure may be on the run during the procedure and therefore cannot be transferred effectively.

In addition, an applicant may also return to their country of origin, be transferred on the basis of other rules (e.g..B returns or readmission agreements) or appeal the transfer. In such cases, transfers cannot be made, although a request has been accepted. . . .