In February and March 1914, the Indian government opened bilateral negotiations with the Tibetans in Deli (the conference participants had withdrawn from the Simla winter) with the aim of obtaining Tibetan agreement on the alignment proposal. In his letter [January 23, 1959], Zhou made the following points to Nehru for the first time. First, that the Sino-Indian border had never been formally demarcated and no contract or agreement had been concluded between the Chinese central government and the Indian government. Second, that the McMahon Line was a product of The British policy of aggression against the Tibetan region of China. Third, Zhou acknowledged that local Tibetan authorities had signed the convention, but were unhappy with the „unilaterally drawn“ line. Nevertheless, Mr. Zhou said that „the Chinese government believes it is necessary to adopt a realistic attitude towards the McMahon line.“ Article 5. The Chinese and Tibetan Governments undertake not to enter into negotiations or agreements on Tibet between themselves or with any other Power, with the exception of negotiations and agreements between Great Britain and Tibet, as provided for in the Convention of 7 September 1904 between Great Britain and Tibet and the Convention of 27 April. 1906, between Great Britain and China.

His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the British Overseas Dominions, Emperor of India, His Excellency the President of the Republic of China and His Holiness the Dalai Lama of Tibet, sincerely desiring to resolve by mutual agreement various issues concerning the interests of their various States on the Asian continent, and to regulate the relations of their various Governments, decided to conclude an agreement on this matter and, to this end, appointed their respective proxies, that is, not only were the borders of India and Tibet not discussed at the conference, but at no time did the conference or, later, the Chinese object; For the Chinese representative in Simla, Ivan Chen was perfectly aware of the McMahon line. It would be a travesty to suggest anything else, since he was present at the signing ceremony of the Simla Convention on July 3, 1914. From January 15 to 31, 1914, talks were held on the Indo-Tibetan border between the Anglo-Indian government and Tibet. At the 4th Session of the Full Conference on February 17, 1914, McMahon presented a declaration on the territorial boundaries of Tibet. A map attached to the statement showed Tibet`s „historical borders,“ which later became known as the McMahon Line. There was no Chinese dissent. This was followed by talks between Britain and Tibet, which resulted in an agreement that was included in the exchange of letters between McMahon and Lonchen Shatra. The proposed border between India and Tibet was formally validated on 24 and 25 March 1914 and presented at the 7th General Assembly of All Delegates on 22 April 1914.

The British government sees its new positions as an update of its position, while others have seen it as a major change in the British position. [e] Tibetan Robert Barnett believes the decision has a wider impact. India`s claim to part of its northeastern territories, for example, is largely based on the same chords — notes exchanged at the 1914 Simla Convention that established the border between India and Tibet — that the British seem to have simply rejected. [28] It has been speculated that Britain`s postponement took place in exchange for a larger chinese contribution to the International Monetary Fund. [28] [35] [36] The border between Tibet and India was privately negotiated in Simla between representatives of the United Kingdom and Tibet in the absence of the Chinese representative. . . .